Debunking the myth of the "angry, Black woman": An exploration of anger in young, African American women

dc.contributor.authorJeanette Walley-Jean
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-21T13:44:53Z
dc.date.available2024-05-21T13:44:53Z
dc.description.abstractResearch on anger in African American females is lacking yet extremely important. The “angry, Black woman” stereotype has dominated society’s view of African American females; however, evidence supporting the stereotype is non-existent. This project explored anger in seventy-six African-American women. Participants completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2. It was hypothesized that participant scores would be higher than the normative sample. Study participants reported significantly less Angry Reaction. Additionally, younger women reported significantly less Anger Expression-Out while older women reported significantly less Anger Control-In. Results of the study provide initial empirical evidence debunking the stereotype of the “angry, Black woman.”
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12951/1679
dc.titleDebunking the myth of the "angry, Black woman": An exploration of anger in young, African American women
dc.typeJournal Article, Academic Journal
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBlack Women, Gender, and Families: A Black Women’s Studies Journal (Awaiting feedback from editors on second revisions) 3(2), 68-86, (Fall 2009)
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