A Discipline of Submission: Themes of Tension in Allen Tate and Paul Ricoeur

dc.contributor.authorRobert Vaughan
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-21T13:44:49Z
dc.date.available2024-05-21T13:44:49Z
dc.description.abstractAllen Tate will likely always be identified as a “New Critic,” but modern scholars have tended to overlook the fact that later essays like “Literature as Knowledge,” “The Hovering Fly,” and “The Angelic Imagination” actually anticipated the looming revolution in critical theory. “The Angelic Imagination,” which focuses on several prose works of Edgar Allan Poe, specifically identifies the same cognitive disconnection the philosopher Paul Ricoeur would call “fallibility” more than a generation later. “Fallibility” is a concept central to Ricoeur’s theories of the will, and a Tate-Ricoeur dialectic highlights numerous other significant similarities in their philosophies. In particular, Tate’s notion of “tension” foresees key aspects of Ricoeur’s theories of metaphoricity. The congruence of their ideas merits Tate’s reintroduction into current discussions of hermeneutical phenomenology and post-structuralist theory.
dc.identifierhttps://www.missq.msstate.edu/
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12951/1651
dc.titleA Discipline of Submission: Themes of Tension in Allen Tate and Paul Ricoeur
dc.typeJournal Article, Academic Journal
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMississippi Quarterly (Johns Hopkins University Press) 74(3), 335-357, (March 2022)
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