Reading Relational in Mildred Taylor: Toward a Black Feminist Care Ethics for Children's Literature

dc.contributor.authorWesley Jacques
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-21T13:35:27Z
dc.date.available2024-05-21T13:35:27Z
dc.description.abstractEven as Taylor's 1976 award-winning novel <i>Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry</i> presents formal educators, business owners, community leaders, and friends as morally compromised by Jim Crow-era white supremacy, the story suggests that young people remain indispensable to ethical work, both in theory and in praxis. Cassie and her first-person perspective are squarely placed at the core of this narrative work. This paper argues that Integrating the rhetoric of care ethics with Black feminist thought, calling upon the work of scholars from Nel Noddings to Patricia Hill Collins among others, reveals that considerations of alternate standpoints add significantly to politically-attuned ethical praxis and teaching.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12951/690
dc.titleReading Relational in Mildred Taylor: Toward a Black Feminist Care Ethics for Children's Literature
dc.typeJournal Article, Academic Journal
dcterms.bibliographicCitationResearch on Diversity in Youth Literature 2(2), (January 18, 2020)
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